#WORLD RABIES DAY | 28 September 2021 | Rabies: Facts not Fear | Awareness


September 28 is #WorldRabiesDay! The theme for this year is “Rabies: Facts, not Fear.” The theme focuses on facts about rabies and dispelling any myths or misconceptions.

Rabies is a deadly but preventable disease – let’s play our part to keep our communities safe!

#RabiesEndsHere – vaccinate your dogs and cats by visiting your local veterinarian or state veterinarian.

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

What is Rabies?

Rabies is a zoonotic disease (which means that people can become infected by an infected animal). The virus is shed in saliva and is spread mainly by the bite of an infected animal. Rabies affects the brain and is fatal once a person or animal shows clinical signs.

Animals infected by rabies show changes in behavior and neurological symptoms. They may salivate, become paralyzed, are unable to swallow, may vocalize continuously, and may become aggressive or non-responsive.

Report any suspect rabid animals immediately to your state or private veterinarian, Animal Health Technician or the police.

#RabiesEndsHere – vaccinate your dogs and cats by visiting your local veterinarian or state veterinarian.

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #EndRabiesNow #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation  

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Signs and Symptoms of rabies in humans.

Fact: Rabies kills someone every 9 minutes, globally.

If you are bitten, scratched or licked by a suspected rabid animal, apply the following steps:

Wash the wound well with soap and running water for 15 minutes. Immediately seek medical treatment at your nearest medical facility. To prevent rabies, a series of vaccinations will be given and if required, rabies antibodies will be administered.

#RabiesEndsHere – vaccinate your dogs and cats by visiting your local veterinarian or state veterinarian.

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #EndRabiesNow #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation   @GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Why is it important to vaccinate your dogs and cats?

By law, all dogs and cats in South Africa must be vaccinated against rabies.

The first rabies vaccine is given at 12 weeks (3 months) of age, followed by a booster vaccination between one to 12 months later. Thereafter a booster every three years. In high-risk areas, annual vaccination is strongly recommended.

It is never too late for your pet to receive their first vaccination, followed by the booster protocol.

If dogs and cats are effectively vaccinated and boosted as required, it creates a buffer of protection for humans as well as against other wildlife species that may have rabies.

Fact: Vaccinating 70% of dogs in at risk areas can eliminate canine rabies.

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #EndRabiesNow #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation   @GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Photo credit: Global Alliance for Rabies Control

Facts not fear!

#WorldRabiesDay2021 theme is “Rabies: Facts, not Fear.” Fake news can negatively affect our rabies elimination efforts. Facts are the only way to beat fake news. Let us share #RabiesFacts and ensure that we empower ourselves with knowledge to prevent this disease.  

Rabies is present in all nine provinces of South Africa and no one can afford not to have their dogs and cats vaccinated. High risk dog rabies cycles are focussed in Limpopo, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape Provinces, as well as the border between Lesotho and Free State Province,

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #EndRabiesNow #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation  

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Facts not fear!

Let’s dispel 3 common myths about rabies that people believe. By staying informed of the facts, we can help others stay safe. 

Myth #1: Rabies is not preventable

Myth#2: There is no treatment for rabies 

Myth #3: Rabies is only transmitted by dog bites

Fact#1: Rabies IS preventable

Fact#2: There is treatment for rabies, but it must be given correctly and IMMEDIATELY after exposure to a rabid animal 

Fact#3: Rabies can be transmitted by the bite of any infected mammal, but most commonly by dog bites

#RabiesEndsHere and vaccinate your animal by visiting your local veterinarian or state veterinarian.

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #EndRabiesNow #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation  

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Photo credit: Dr Mariana Khoza

Local Programme Initiatives

Provincial Government Veterinary Services host rabies awareness and vaccination campaigns in communities. During outbreaks, these initiatives are enhanced to control the spread of the disease. Some private veterinary clinics and welfare organisations also host and assist with rabies vaccination campaigns in the communities they serve.

South Africa is committed to the global “Zero by 30” goal – For zero human deaths due to dog mediated rabies by 2030. This can be achieved through adequate vaccination of dog (and cat) populations, as well as provision of treatment to humans that have been exposed to rabid animals.

#WorldRabiesDay #Rabies #FactsNotFear #SAVArabiesday

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation  

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl

Photo credit: Global Alliance for Rabies Control

#WorldRabiesDay

Happy 15th #WorldRabiesDay! Let us celebrate this milestone by sharing #RabiesFacts and dispelling misconceptions to save lives. Together, we can #EndRabiesNow!

@SouthAfricanVeterinaryAssociation  

@GlobalAllianceforRabiesControl